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H H S Department of Health and Human Services
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration

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LGBT Health

Take Pride in Your Health. Learn more at HHS.gov/HealthCare

People who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) are diverse, but have a common need for culturally competent health care that recognizes and responds to medical risks specific to this population. 

LGBT people face greater health threats than their heterosexual peers, partly because of differences in sexual behavior and partly because of social and structural inequities, such as stigma and discrimination.

Primary Health Care for Underserved People

The National LGBT Health Education Center helps community health centers improve the health of LGBT populations. Supported through a cooperative agreement with The Fenway Institute, the Center consults with health centers and is developing curricula focused on caring for LGBT people. Fenway Health is a HRSA-supported health center and one of the largest health centers focused on LGBT health. Upcoming and On-Demand Webinars

Health centers provide primary health care to more than 19 million people each year – nearly 93 percent of them poor and 37 percent uninsured. Learn more: The Health Center Program

HIV/AIDS

HIV/AIDS is by no means a strictly LGBT issue, but men having sex with men is still the most prevalent transmission category, accounting for 77 percent of HIV diagnoses in 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Ryan White Program works with cities, states, and local community-based organization to provide HIV-related services to more than half a million people each year. The program is for those who do not have sufficient health care coverage or financial resources for coping with HIV disease. Ryan White fills gaps in care not covered by these other sources.

Learn more: HIV/AIDS Programs

Women's Health Data

Research suggests that lesbian and bisexual women are at increased risk for adverse health outcomes, including overweight and obesity, poor mental health, substance abuse, violence, and barriers to optimal health care resulting from social and economic inequities.1,2 Although frequently referred to as part of a larger group of sexual minorities, including gay men and transgender individuals, the health status and needs of lesbians and bisexual women are uniquely shaped by a range of factors including sexual identity and behavior, as well as traditional sociodemographic factors, like age, education, and race and ethnicity.

Selected Health Characteristics Among Females age 18-44, by sexual orientation

Learn more: Women's Health USA 2011: Lesbian and Bisexual Women