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Maternal and Child Health Researchers Gather at HRSA

rin Reiney (left) and Joan Scott of HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau -- both former Johns Hopkins researchers -- addressed more than 30 HRSA-funded scientists from nine states on June 13.
Erin Reiney (left) and Joan Scott of HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) -- both former Johns Hopkins researchers -- addressed more than 30 HRSA-funded scientists from nine states on June 13. The grantees are among the most prominent experts in the nation in such arenas as autism, obesity and childhood neurological disabilities.

 

MCHB Dir. of the Office Epidemiology and Research Michael Kogan (center) and Romuladus Azuine, Dir. of the Div. of Research (second, left of center) welcomed the largest cohort of HRSA maternal and child health researchers in recent memory to HRSA
MCHB Dir. of the Office Epidemiology and Research Michael Kogan (center) and Romuladus Azuine, Dir. of the Div. of Research (second, left of center) welcomed the largest cohort of HRSA maternal and child health researchers in recent memory to HRSA. The agency funds 15 research networks involving investigators at 900 universities, colleges, medical centers and other teaching institutions -- many of them long-term, one-of-a-kind projects.

 

The Autism Intervention Research Network on Behavioral Health, for example, includes scientists at four major universities in California, New York and Pennsylvania; 2,400 research participants in high-poverty communities and schools; and has resulted in 117 publications in the past five years.

The goal of the networks is to arrive at "actionable" recommendations from ongoing research that can be rapidly translated into practical changes in the field through community conferences with affected families, advocates, providers and health officials.

Among the best known is the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) -- which enlists universities, hospitals, fire companies and emergency medical service crews across 18 states to improve survivability and health outcomes for sick and injured kids in crisis situations. So far, 117,000 children have been involved in 73 HRSA-funded studies that have dramatically improved emergency procedures, both before and after patients reach the hospital.

Date Last Reviewed:  July 2019