HRSA Hosts 200 Grantees

Deputy Administrator Brian LeClair welcomed grantees from 40 States, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands to two days of  workshops on how to maintain "healthy grants."
Deputy Administrator Brian LeClair welcomed grantees from 40 States, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands to two days of  workshops on how to maintain "healthy grants." Said LeClair: "We jump at the opportunity to visit with the people who are on the front lines ... to improve the health of the nation."

 

"As a HRSA award recipient, you know HRSA's mission. Every day, we are working to increase access to health care for people who are medically underserved or geographically isolated. We do this by providing grants and cooperative agreements to approximately 3,000 awardees ... Our programs serve tens of millions of people, and we know these programs would not be successful without our award recipients."

--Brian LeClair

 

Accountability, integrity: Deputy Associate Administrator of the Office of Federal Assistance Management Rimas Liogys outlined for the one out of four attendees who are new to the agency exactly how his office works.
Accountability, integrity: Deputy Associate Administrator of the HRSA Office of Federal Assistance Management (OFAM) Rimas Liogys outlined for the one out of four attendees who are new to the agency exactly how his office works. They also received presentations from project officers, program leads and Bureau and Office chiefs.

 

In 2008, Liogys noted, HRSA had a budget of about $5 billion a year. A decade later, that number had jumped  to over $10 billion. "So as (federal) budgets have been shrinking," he said, "Congress has shown that it supports HRSA's mission, and continues to grow the organization -- and the services that we provide to the American public."

Those funds support 90 HRSA programs, run by the agency's six major bureaus and offices, but the buck stops (and starts) at OFAM -- which essentially functions as the oversight office for all HRSA awards.

"We provide leadership on the administration of grants, from a financial and integrity perspective," he told the visiting recipients. "It's our responsibility to ensure that funds are spent properly -- with no fraud, waste or abuse -- that people understand their responsibility and the accountability of managing federal awards. We don't just put it on a stump and walk away."

"A lot of thought goes into this," he said.

 

Supervisory Grants Manager Angela Stokes (foreground) and colleagues were kept busy over the two-day workshop event, April 16-17, which included 20 training sessions throughout headquarters. The office will hold regional workshops in Atlanta and Kansas City in coming months.
Supervisory Grants Manager Angela Stokes (foreground) and colleagues were kept busy over the two-day workshop event, April 16-17, which included 20 training sessions throughout headquarters. The office will hold regional workshops in Atlanta and Kansas City in coming months.

 

OFAM's Division of Financial Integrity conducted 298 audits last year, part of which was to establish grantees' "risk level." "Whenever they are out there, they are there to help by providing fiscal technical assistance ... prior to an organization getting into trouble," Liogys assured grantees.

Date Last Reviewed:  April 2019